Tiago is 100% correct here. You really are better at anything you do when you do it with confidence, I haven’t haven’t sang in a while since I lost my guitar but I use to have half@sssd confidence in it. I started singing again tonight and was confident anything is achievable if you set your mind (also had a lot of complements about my ability which helps) and I have been singing better then I ever have before, all day today. When you don’t believe in your abilities you don’t give it your all, the key is believing in yourself completely so can give it everything you have, without sabotaging yourself due to worry that your best isn’t good enough. Your mind is your own best friend and worst enemy.
My vocal teacher strongly encourages me to sing in low register, saying that is where most commercial songs are ‘located’ and from where shout occurs. However, I feel that once I get to C5, I naturally mix and can actually better control my vocals and do a better job of lifting my soft palette, which is, admittedly, more difficult to do in low while going to a higher pitch. So the question is, is it better to avoid mixing and sing in LR as much as possible?
My teaching approach: I tailor my lessons to fit the students goals. Beginner students want to learn songs, not theory. So I get the student playing /singing before I focus on scales and theory. I want to teach the student what they want to learn as well as giving them the skills to be a good musician/vocalist. I also determine what your learning style is, so that I can effectively teach you in the way you learn best. I have over 14 years teaching experience in guitar and voice, and I teach songwriting and ukulele as well.  I’ve been performing locally and internationally for over 7 years
What I think about the teacher: I like Aaron’s style since he speaks very coherently and gets his message across in a nice way and without blabbering. If you like watching YouTube lessons so you know this isn’t something trivial. You can check him out in his YouTube channel and judge for yourself. I still follow his channel even though I finished the main singing course two years ago since he regularly uploads good stuff and singing tips.
Some recognize notes and enjoy a melody, but say they can’t sing or play. I say you can sing and you can play. If you just follow the proper singing lessons and proper instrument basics, you can sing and play. It is not difficult but simple. All you have to do is to put some effort. Just to practice and that is all what matters.
Before you rush to figure out what type of singing voice you have, there are two things to keep in mind. Firstly, if you’re a male under 22, or a female under 20, then your vocal range is still developing and you won’t know your true voice type until you’re a little bit older.
We do not guarantee critiques from Christina. We may have opportunities for students to submit work to Christina, and students will be notified as those opportunities arise. MasterClass does not accept unsolicited work.
The deluxe package is available for even less at $77. The deluxe package includes Superior High Notes, Superior Vocal Health, Superior Vibrato and many other modules. Yes, the deluxe package is cheaper. There is also a 60 day money back guarantee.
Hello, I am having trouble determining/keeping my vocal tone. I sometimes have the tone like Toby Keith or Trace Adkins, and sometimes I am not even close. I am not sure what to do to find and keep that tone. Is there a secret to enhancing the deep dark tone? I seemed to drink too much coffee, do you think that is the reason? dehydration? Thanks, Gary
Aaron Anastasi is the founder of Superior Singing Method. He’s a famous vocal coach (and an actor actually, IMDB) from Los Angeles, California. He has a successful YouTube channel with currently over 5,000,000 views and almost a 100K subscribers.
Here’s what I did: I downloaded the exercises before watching the videos or while watching them. Downloading them like that was a great help. Once I went through all the materials, I was able to perform the exercises properly without needing much assistance.

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Another important note about solfa is that it’s the key to sight-singing music easily. This means that you can confidently go along to a choir or other singing group and know that if they hand you sheet music you don’t need to panic! You can use solfa to know what notes to sing and your newfound vocal control to know you’ll be singing them right.
When selecting the person who will help you achieve greatness and eventually get into a program or school of your dreams, look for someone who has managed to work as a Singer or Vocalist of some kind before.
Maureen has been teaching private voice and piano lessons since 2009, and currently runs her own studio, as well as traveling to students’ homes to teach lessons. She teaches anyone with an interest and willingness to learn, regardless of experience level.
Staying away from caffeine, smoke, and alcohol. Those three substances can damage your voice. If you want to sing well, you have to avoid at least going overboard – drinking too much coffee, chain smoking, and taking in a lot of alcoholic beverages.
First of all, Aaron’s program covers all key aspects of singing, from singing higher notes to gaining more power and vocal agility, improving your pitch, increasing your range, and also singing for longer periods without getting fatigued.
Singing with your head voice, singing with your chest voice and bringing them together in harmony are some of the techniques you will learn in Module 6. Blending these two different voices together and transitioning smoothly from one voice to the other are some of the important aspects you want to learn to become a better singer.
The doctor  will use a “Scope”- a little video camera on the end of a teeny cord- to determine if you have nodules or some type of tissue damage. He/she will also determine if you have an infection or allergy that has made your vocal cords inflamed. (Females with hormonal problems can have their vocal health yo-yo about.) The E.N.T. should check if you have GERD- acid reflux- where stomach acids are burning your vocal cords. Once all medical conditions are ruled out or treated, see a voice teacher who can evaluate if you are straining, if your song keys are wrong, and such. Then take a few months of lessons- 3 should do it,- and reverse any bad habits. You also need a custom warm-up routine to use before performing. Ask your voice teacher to evaluate your live show. You could be doing something different up there that is blowing you out. Read About Singers Secrets for maintaining a healthy voice.
Learn to use your nose. Good singing involves partial nasal placement; it is our body’s soundboard. To avoid sounding nasal to others, however, your throat must be wide open with your tongue out of the way (slightly forward, touching the backs of bottom teeth when singing vowels). Nasality can often be heard in country singing and some R&B/Gospel, but can be unappealing to listen to.
KTVA’s Singing Lessons for Beginners are the exact same lessons we teach our professional singers – when you enroll in the How To Sing – Better Than Anyone Else vocal course, you will start at the beginning and take your time with Volume 1. Ken Tamplin will SHOW YOU (not just tell you) how to use your voice correctly and you will experience a breakthrough right from the start.  You will learn to sing the right way!
Take a breath, think of a word like “who”, “where”, or “whah”, say it out aloud and don’t allow the vowel sound to finish. Keep the sound going (or resonating) for as long as possible – even after the count of one second you will be singing.
Start from an estimated guess as to what you feel the note sounds like to match pitch. Move the pitch of your voice up and down the scale as a siren until you match the desired pitch. You will be able to hear and feel when you meet this match.
View the prospects listed in “tips” before moving on to the steps. The “tips” show certain valuable references on correct singing, such as raising the soft palate, breathing and posture, jaw placement, breath control, and other aspects. The steps provide vocal warm-ups which may be beneficial as part of a vocal training practice. Enjoy!
Yes there is. Most singers have breaks in their voice. You have to strengthen that area by exercising your voice with specific vocal exercises while holding your jaw down to lower the larynx. It is a process. You shouldn’t open the jaw too far (only about 1.5-2″ depending on how easily your jaw opens) This is a process we use in vocal technique that is a bit more complex than that but you can start with these exercises here https://www.caricole.com/singersgift
My passion and love for teaching music has allowed me to serve students of all ages and all levels in the Dallas-Forth Worth Metroplex for the past 18 years. My teaching style is one of fun, flexibility, and empowering to the individual. No two students are alike. Each is uniquely created and endowed with different talents and giftings. Discover your ability to make music and let me coach you on your exciting musical journey. More information is available at my website: www.carrolltonmusic.com
As you work through these steps remember that learning to sing in tune is simple and methodical process. You might hit some snags along the way (because learning is like that) but as long as you follow this process and don’t try to run before you can walk, you should find it is a smooth and enjoyable journey.
The course covers every basic aspect of singing. It also includes different vocal warm-ups and exercises. Singorama could have been a great course all-in-all except for it being totally software based, meaning all your training will only be through your computer.
Singing louder and singing softer should take the same amount of breath support, and vocal strain should not be experienced, either way. Using diaphragm breathing, these variations can be controlled throughout the song. Try alternatively bringing your right and left hands forward, one after and over the other. This technique is used to add volume to your voice to sing in forte or fortissimo.