International recording artist, entertainer, and music educator NaTasha Rogers, respectfully known as #THETALKBOXQUEEN, is back from Japan & ready to serve & empower future recording artists and entertainers alike! Ages 18 & up! *Younger students accepted on case by case basis 19+ years in the music entertainment industry! Texas Certified Music License EC-12! *10 years Music Producer! *Multi-Genre (Pop, R&B, Gospel, Hip-Hop, & More!) Audio Engineer! Songwriter! Jazz Vocalist and Pianist! Music Theory 101! Live Performance Normal 0 false false
A singing teacher will be able to notice and correct bad habits that lead to injuries and negatively affect your sound. Additionally, the motivation and inspiration you can get from this type of guidance makes a huge difference in your learning process.
Raspy voices usually come from dehydration so be sure you get a lot of water! 8-10 glasses per day. Cracks happen from allergies and reflux. Stay away from acidic foods (orange juice, marinara sauce and fried foods are the biggest offenders.) Cracks also happen frequently to weak voices and you can strengthen yours with vocal training – start here https://www.caricole.com/singersgift
Mic check. Christina breaks down the difference between live performance and studio time, as well as the microphone techniques she’s perfected over her career. Then, get a rare glimpse into the recording booth as you watch Christina perform her iconic song ‘Beautiful’.
Think of yourself as an athlete and eat that way: an athlete wouldn’t stuff herself with food just before running the mile and neither should you. A full stomach inhibits the movement of the diaphragm-you’ll have difficulty taking in full breaths and you’ll be prone to burping. Don’t starve yourself, either–singing is hard work, you need fuel. A normal meal an hour or two (two is better) before a singing session works best. If you need to eat between sets go for non-bulky, easy to digest food. Before a show I like eggs–high protein, low density.
Of course, it’s one thing to sing freely in a rehearsal room, quite another to do so in public. And so, two days later, I head to All Star Lanes in Brick Lane, London, to test out my new skills. The pressure’s on: standing in front of my audience of six friends, I suddenly know exactly how it feels to be Chris Martin surveying Glastonbury’s Pyramid stage crowd. But the pressure doesn’t last long. Less than a minute into my rendition of Don’t Stop and my friend Jim turns to me: “Have you been taking singing lessons?” For the first time in his life, he doesn’t appear to be taking the piss. The night is 60 seconds old and it’s already an unqualified success.
Who doesn’t want more power without strain? This is a simple technique to apply and a bit easier than the one above. All you have to do is to keep your chin pointed slightly down and your pectorals slightly flexed (well sometimes it’s a lot flexed) when you go for more power. Most singers reach forward or lift their chin up to sing with more power. While it may temporarily work, it causes vocal problems.  Tipping your chin down not only works better and saves your voice – it actually SOUNDS better! Stand in front of the good ‘ol mirror. Sing an Ah scale up and down in one phrase (1-2-3-4-3-2-1). Press your chin slightly in (point your chin towards the floor) — usually only 1” or so. Don’t let your head bob up as you raise the pitch. Keep it firmly in place. Go all the way up the scale of your voice keeping this position. Notice how your chin wants to move up as you raise your pitch. Keep it planted. This will give you more power and control and eliminate strain. Practice it until it becomes natural!
Here’s what I did: I downloaded the exercises before watching the videos or while watching them. Downloading them like that was a great help. Once I went through all the materials, I was able to perform the exercises properly without needing much assistance.
If you try to learn how to sing from free lessons, you’ll soon discover that’s it’s a painful task because there isn’t a library of lessons and steps from A to Z. This is why an actual program of online singing lessons is recommended to get you organized and on the right path to improve your voice correctly.

Superior Singing Method

online singing lessons

learn to sing
superior singing method review

Module 7 will teach you all about vocal agility. Vocal agility is something that every great singer possesses. You must be able to transition from one note to another while preventing your voice from cracking.
Begin with the solfege symbol “do” while singing the pitch. Hold out this note to the extent of your comfort. Then, sing and signal the note “re” while holding it out. Then, go back down and sing the note “do.” The object is to move on and sing from “do” to “mi,” then “do” to “fa,” then “do” to “so,” then “do” to “la” then “do” to “ti,” then “do” to “do,” or as far as desired.
I was a professional opera singer in Europe before returning to take care of my family. I have a Master of Music degree and have been teaching since 1988. I developed my methods myself, based on sound scientific data and original research.
I fully believe that music is beneficial to everyone that comes into contact with it; with small children, it enhances learning and cultivated concentration. With older kids, it boosts confidence and sharpens listening skills while using math, problem solving, and hand-eye coordination skills. Whether you are singing, playing piano, doing theory homework, or yan ear training course, I can help! I have been teaching for about 8 years and have been in the Dallas area since summer 2016. I teach privately and at several studios in the DFW area. I am finishing my Masters st SMU in Voice Performance
Now for your, starting to get a better sense of pitch, I want you start thinking of your notes as circles. You want to aim for the bullseye. The best way to do this and do it well is to record yourself and listen back. The first thing in determining whether you are singing on pitch is understanding whether you are singing sharp, on the sharp side, or the flat side of the note. I like to take it to the max first. Let’s sing at the center of pitch and then go outside of the pitch, so that you can hear that difference.
Diction is how well you pronounce words while singing. It’s also known as “articulation.” In most contemporary music — especially pop, country, and rap — the lyrics are an integral part of the song. So as a singer, it’s your job to share those lyrics with your audience.
First of all these programs make it a breeze for me to edit, play back, print and hear music sheets. I can save these files and experiment with them as much as I like. You can save these files in mp3 format and copy it to an mp3 player. Isn’t that a more convenient way to assess your work and check which elements need working on? Continue Reading »
Be mindful of tempos and keys. Every decade of your adult life (between ages 15-25, again at 25-35 and again after 50) your vocal timbre and range is different. You have to allow for these changes in adjusting keys, tempos and song selection.
It’s always a good idea to go through the program more than once. You’ll definitely need to go through the vocal exercises a few times until you have them all memorized. But I find this course have all the material to practice and become a good singer,
Julia is a friendly, energetic, and caring person as well as being immensely talented! My daughter was so elated after her first lesson with Julia. She has a way of making the student feel comfortable and is very encouraging while teaching. I can’t say thank you enough to Julia!
Hello, well I’m 17 and a dude and I really do love music and the way I can connect to it… but I also have severe anxiety and am so nervous about anything and everything…. I’ve been trying to teach myself to sing better and play a guitar but it’s way too much to teach myself…. any tips on here on where to go? I honestly Don’t Think I sound that great and I’m really Self concious about it But I Feel Like If I Had A Better Understanding of it all
We are an independently owned organization, and committed to the preservation of this extravagant music industry. We will be posting stories and information about South African Jazz as well as interesting items from the wide world of jazz. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed are entirely those of the authors of each article. We hope to give an insight into the happenings of any art form that has a strong bond with jazz. Whilst this website will also focus on information and reviews from a wide variety of international sources however we will not lose sight of the main focus which is Southern African jazz.
I’d been thinking about voice lessons for years, and finally started about a year ago. My wife found an instructor through the NATS website (National Association of Teachers of Singing) and I definitely recommend finding an instructor who has some kind of real, formal training, and who also has background in the style of music you’re interested in (most formally trained teachers seem to have a background in classical, chorale, and musical theatre, though some also cover pop, jazz, rock and even country). I started out with 30 minute lessons each week for $35 each, and eventually moved to 45 minute lessons at $50 each. Each class covers warm ups and vocal exercises for about 10-15 minutes, then reviewing the current songs with feedback, and occasionally generally discussing technique and style. The instructor also provides sheet music, mp3 recordings of the lessons, and mp3s of the accompaniments.
The A-O joint – Your very top vertebra, AKA the “atlas,” forms a joint with the bottom of your skull to support your head. Balance your head on this joint (the A-O joint) so that you are neither looking up or down. A properly balanced A-O joint reduces neck and jaw tension.
The program is spread across 8 modules that cover all key areas of your voice, coming with more than 50 singing lesson videos, 31 dynamic vocal exercise audios, and daily vocal exercise routines that will show you the steps you need to take to improve the sounding of your voice.
You can find online exercises for this, especially increasing your upper range by learning the “mixed voice” register. However, it’s easy to strain your voice if you don’t know how to use your muscles properly. It’s best to ask a vocal coach for guidance, or to learn the amazing things you can do with your current range.
If you notice the keys on the piano, note that the pitch “do” occurs more than once along the keys. The entire range of notes from one “do” to the next is called an octave. As your vocal range expands, you may achieve the ability to sing several octaves. To practice this, a piano would be very helpful. Press the key of the note “do” on the piano. This may be anywhere, depending on the type of instrument you have, such as a soprano, alto, or mezzo. Note that your voice will be traveling in an uprising fashion, so choose the spot accordingly. Start from a pitch you can comfortably sing. If you are an alto, it is best to start at a spot further down on the piano. Likewise, if you sing soprano, start higher. Mezzos should find a spot somewhere in between, midway throughout the keys. If you do not know your vocal type, make an estimate and find what works for you. Press the key “do” on the piano, and match pitch with your voice. Hold out this note as long as you comfortably can. Then, press the “do” one octave higher than the one you were singing and match pitch, holding it out accordingly. If you find this is too high for you, either start lower from the beginning, or you could try half of an octave by going from “do” to “so” instead. After singing the higher note “do” match pitch with the lower one again and sing it out to a comfortable extent. If you are a beginner, this may be enough octave training for the day. If you choose to persevere and move on, try singing out the note “re” as long as you comfortably can, then matching pitch with the higher note “re” and holding it as long as you may. Then hold out the lower note “re” once more. Try this practice with the notes “mi, fa,, so, la, ti, etc. depending on the stretch of your range. This exercise is intended to lengthen and strengthen the range of your vocal chords. Please be cautioned of straining your instrument.
My goal for my students is to grow in their love for music, while building a strong foundation of musical skill. I own and teach from my commercial studio in Midlothian, Perfect Pitch Music Academy (www.perfectpitchmusicacademy.com), as well as a second studio in Duncanville. My studio offers piano, voice and guitars lessons. We have three recitals throughout the year. My students have fun during lessons while at the same time learning the musical theory and technique needed to progress! 
I’m experienced (over 25 years of experience) and a great teacher…very compassionate, patient, and encouraging.  I can also teach a wide variety of instruments. I have a bachelors and masters degree in music.
Hello! My name is Kelsi Phillips and I love music. Music is everything to me. It’s why I get out of bed in the morning, and something I love even more than just listening to it, is playing it. I love it and I would love to share my passion for it with you. We can do anything we put our minds to and I believe that if you want to become the best musician in the world, you can! I teach everything by ear, I don’t read music. But a lot of people can’t do that which is amazing in my book. But I will do the best I can to help you on this journey to learning the greatness of music.
Sing the pitches “do re mi fa so mi do.” Sing “zi-ya” on the pitches. “Zi” is to be sung on “do re mi fa” in legato. Make these notes smooth and connected. “Ya” is to be sung on “so mi do.” It is supposedly sung in staccato. Make these notes short and separate, just like you sang “ha.” Putting these concepts together requires practice, as it involves transitioning between concepts. When singing “zi,” try to keep the jaw relaxed. Do not open your mouth too wide. In fact,sing this note with a rounded mouth that is only slightly open. This way, you will achieve a soft sound that is round and full. When you sing “ya,” do not widen the mouth once again. Slightly elongate the shape of your mouth. Because this also involves arpeggiation to some extent, it is always best to leave your hand on your diaphragm.
Pollen season or other allergies hit, you get rear-nasal drip, and it drips down to your vocal cords and irritates them. Prescription allergy medicines can overly dry out your cords. Instead, clean out your nose with saline then line it with vaseline or its equivalent. This prevents the allergens from getting into your system and setting you off. This won’t help after an allergic reaction, but do it first thing in the morning as a preventative measure during allergy season.
Module 5 contains many new singing exercises. Aaron will also provide you with a thorough explanation as to why he is getting you to do all these different exercises and techniques. Always remember to go through everything for you not to miss any of the great stuff.
Fun app with good live feedback on your pitch on exercises and overlay of your voice with the song. A few suggestions: let the user adjust the levels of their recorded playback and the snippet of the actual song independently, let the user scrub back to replay an earlier recorded section, let the user stop performing the song early if they choose, add a save button to previous recordings. The buttons for the iPhone X could be larger or otherwise more responsive. I’m also having some trouble with my mic disconnecting or coming in and out, and I don’t think it’s a hardware issue since I can pull up another app and record fine when I encounter the issue mid performance. More song choice would also be welcome.
Everyone would love to be able to sing one of these famous singer’s songs and hit every note, but most cannot. Instead, it’s important to understand your own personal range, and keep it in consideration as you’re warming up and selecting repertoire.
After much research, I have to say that the Superior Singing Method is an effective program that will bring out your hidden vocal talent. The lessons are very easy to follow and as many reviewers have noted, they’re much more comprehensive than traditional singing classes. It’s not just effective but affordable too, so I have to give it my full recommendation.
Here’s an extra tip: don’t throw the recordings away! Save each one, putting the song name and today’s date in the filename. Then, after a few days of practicing a song, come back and listen to one of your earlier performances. You’ll most likely be able to hear a big improvement and that will encourage you to keep at it.