Yea, I have some friends in music school and I know how sometimes the lessons there can seem like they go around and around, so it’s fun to have lessons that are practical and get you straight to the point. Also, there’s no need to read note sheets here, so you focus strictly on your ears and vocal cords which I find more straightforward.
If you notice the keys on the piano, note that the pitch “do” occurs more than once along the keys. The entire range of notes from one “do” to the next is called an octave. As your vocal range expands, you may achieve the ability to sing several octaves. To practice this, a piano would be very helpful. Press the key of the note “do” on the piano. This may be anywhere, depending on the type of instrument you have, such as a soprano, alto, or mezzo. Note that your voice will be traveling in an uprising fashion, so choose the spot accordingly. Start from a pitch you can comfortably sing. If you are an alto, it is best to start at a spot further down on the piano. Likewise, if you sing soprano, start higher. Mezzos should find a spot somewhere in between, midway throughout the keys. If you do not know your vocal type, make an estimate and find what works for you. Press the key “do” on the piano, and match pitch with your voice. Hold out this note as long as you comfortably can. Then, press the “do” one octave higher than the one you were singing and match pitch, holding it out accordingly. If you find this is too high for you, either start lower from the beginning, or you could try half of an octave by going from “do” to “so” instead. After singing the higher note “do” match pitch with the lower one again and sing it out to a comfortable extent. If you are a beginner, this may be enough octave training for the day. If you choose to persevere and move on, try singing out the note “re” as long as you comfortably can, then matching pitch with the higher note “re” and holding it as long as you may. Then hold out the lower note “re” once more. Try this practice with the notes “mi, fa,, so, la, ti, etc. depending on the stretch of your range. This exercise is intended to lengthen and strengthen the range of your vocal chords. Please be cautioned of straining your instrument.
Hi Faye! Have you ever considered taking singing classes to improve your skills? Working with a singing instructor who can give you feedback on your voice will drastically boost your confidence. Did you know you can take free singing classes for a month at TakeLessons Live? You should try it! Hope that helps. 🙂
Preparing for an audition? Learn how to select your repertoire with these helpful tips from San Jose teacher Alison C.: Picking out the best song for a musical theater audition is one of the most crucial decisions you’ll make. Your selection must demonstrate not just what a great singer you are, but also your ability and appropriateness for the role you want, your professionalism, and your ability to follow direction.  Of course, once you have your song, you will need to rehearse and coach it t … Read More
Hello, well I’m 17 and a dude and I really do love music and the way I can connect to it… but I also have severe anxiety and am so nervous about anything and everything…. I’ve been trying to teach myself to sing better and play a guitar but it’s way too much to teach myself…. any tips on here on where to go? I honestly Don’t Think I sound that great and I’m really Self concious about it But I Feel Like If I Had A Better Understanding of it all
If you’ve had trouble singing in tune or hitting the right notes when you sing, or somebody has made a comment about you having bad pitching or poor tuning, this is most likely the skill you need to focus on.
Deborah Staiman has been teaching singing for 31 years and in addition to teaching the classical and operatic vocal production, she specializes in building a strong foundation of vocal technique for singers, who sing the musical theatre and popular repertoire. She combines the best that the broadway and popular music singing techniques and the classical Italian “bel canto” singing technique have to offer. She welcomes beginners as well as professionals for singing lessons and classes at her Toronto Singing Studio.

Superior Singing Method

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There is no way you can know as much as the man or woman who will be your Teacher, but you should educate yourself enough to be able to tell who might actually be well-versed on the subject of singing. You want someone who understands all things music, as well as how the human body works. Knowing even the bare minimum can be helpful when selecting the instructor who will prep you for auditions and school admissions events, which can be some of the most nerve-wracking and demanding processes for young talents.
In terms of daily diet, nothing special. If you are talking about what to eat before you sing, try to have a lot of water beforehand. It may not be good to load up on food, since you will be using your diaphragm a lot and it could cause your throat to become dry, irritated, or clogged. Also, avoid foods that produce gas, like soda and large meals. It’s awful when you sing something and you have to burp in the middle of it.
Whether you have a musical background or not, singing is a fun and exciting skill to learn. Online singing classes will help you become more confident with your unique voice, and more comfortable showing it off in front of others.
You’ve probably heard that honey/lemon/and hot water are helpful if you have mucous in your throat. But remember that lemon is drying so don’t overdo it. I prefer gargling, here’s the best way: If your throat feels gunky and/or irritated: mix 1/4 teaspoon baking soda + one cup warm water. Take a small amount of fluid in your mouth and gargle at a high pitch-this causes your vocal cords to contract and rise closer to where you are actually gargling (your epiglottis will prevent the fluid from actually reaching your vocal cords). Spit and repeat several times.
Whether you are looking for a vocal coach but cannot afford one, or you are looking for online singing lessons, the Superior Singing Method will truly help improve your singing voice. Buying this product and going through the course diligently is highly recommended.
Module 7 will teach you all about vocal agility. Vocal agility is something that every great singer possesses. You must be able to transition from one note to another while preventing your voice from cracking.
Learning how to become a singer — whether you dream of selling out large arenas or simply want to feel more confident at karaoke night — takes time and patience. If you’re wondering how long exactly, read on as Orange, CA teacher Adri-Anne R. shares her insights…   When students start voice lessons, they will often ask me, “How long will I have to take lessons before I start to get better?” I have to ask them, “How often and how long are you willing to practice?” In my experien
Try to extend the sound. Imagine the sound stretching or streaming out into the next room. How long can you sustain the sound? Notice that your stomach starts to tighten a bit – that is your diaphragm muscle kicking in to support the sound. Aim for holding the vowel sound for as long as possible while staying relaxed. Count in seconds in your head and keep a record of your progress.
After you get used to it you’ll start to be able to hear how good your voice truly is, and this is where recording yourself becomes a powerful secret weapon. You can hear where your pitching is off and then correct it next time. You can hear when your enunciation isn’t quite right and then improve it. You can start to form an objective opinion about how good a singer you are.
The Superior Singing Method has another benefit and that it can teach you how to sing in front of people and develop self confidence, essential if you want to become a professional singer and perform in front of huge crowds. In short, it doesn’t just provide you with information on how to become a skilled singer, but how to conduct yourself a professional performer.
I can’t remember the last time I sang badly at karaoke. Unfortunately, that’s because whenever I do sing badly at karaoke – which is to say, whenever I try it – I am often so blindingly drunk that I mercifully manage to black out the entire sorry episode.
I have checked out many reviews of the Superior Singing Method and the majority of them are very positive. Miss Alba wrote a review at myhowtosingbetter.blogspot.com and she said “there is no singing guide that has made as much of an impact as the Superior Singing Method” and that the lessons are very easy to understand.
Alfred, Your break is perfectly normal. It’s called “the pssaggio”. The way to fix the break is to train your voice with vocal technique the build strength in the pssaggio or “break” area. Singers are like athletes who need to train the small muscles of the voice to improve performance. Start with these https://www.caricole.com/singersgift In time your break will smooth out and your range will expand as a result! Good luck and keep us posted!
@naught101 My criticism isn’t on the contents of the book and I’m not addressing the possibility that it may be wrong, but rather on the presentation of the text (which is archaic and hard to read). Just try and read the text yourself. It’s not good studying to learn from something that’s hard to grok while there are much more suitable books out there written in modern English. That book is a piece of history that IMO is to be enjoyed by experienced musicians who really feel like a tour down history’s past, not something a beginner should learn from. – bobobobo Sep 23 ’12 at 14:28
These were weekly vocal lessons that each cost me 40$ and lasted for 45 minutes. The first third of each lesson was about doing warm up exercises with the teacher playing the piano, and then working on other stuff the teacher offered, getting tips from her, and working on songs that I personally like.
KTVA’s Singing Lessons for Beginners are the exact same lessons we teach our professional singers – when you enroll in the How To Sing – Better Than Anyone Else vocal course, you will start at the beginning and take your time with Volume 1. Ken Tamplin will SHOW YOU (not just tell you) how to use your voice correctly and you will experience a breakthrough right from the start.  You will learn to sing the right way!
HI Alex, You are probably a high tenor voice. It’s best to take some voice lessons and learn how to use it to get it sounding as good as it can. High tenor voices are sought after so I think if you embrace it you will find it is an asset. In the meanwhile download my Singers Gift Warmups to help you lower your larynx and make your voice feel more comfortable! https://www.caricole.com/singersgift
Just below the introduction video, you will see an option to download that lesson’s vocal exercises. One set of exercises is designed particularly for male vocalist and another set for female vocalists (Isn’t that great?)
Our philosophy is simple. We make learning music fun, and are committed to the integrity of a quality music education. In addition to a foundational education, students are given ample opportunity to make music with others. The confidence gained by learning music parlays with other areas, giving students the self-assurance to take on new challenges.
Ideally you want a program that loosens you up, make you’re voice more flexible, build up your range, and perhaps add new “colors” to your sound. For example, if you can only sing loud or slow, you’ll want to add lighter contrasting tones to make your song emotions more varied. Singing lessons should stretch your range and build breath control and body strength, without interfering with your vocal personality. In fact, lessons should give you more tools to try more unique things! Probably the best thing about lessons is learning how to have power without straining. Poor pitch and a thinning or small range is just a symptom of a more fundamental problem with straining or support. Read More about Vocal Evaluations.
Additionally, the term “voice teacher” or “singing teacher” normally refers to an instructor whose main role is developing the singing voice. The term “vocal coach”, on the other hand, may be appropriated by someone who works on stage performance, vocal style or a host of other subjects that are related to voice, but not necessarily teach singing.[1]
The key to this exercise is to make sure you are listening carefully as you practice. Don’t just rely on the tuner’s display. Try to always hear whether you are too high or too low before checking the display. That way you are gradually developing your own inner tuner so that in future your feedback loop can work directly without the assistance of a digital tuner.