Hi… so when I sing I think I sound really good, but then I record it and listen to it and I sound really young (I’m 15, by the way) and shy, and my voice just sounds really unnatural. My choir teacher recently asked me to start cantoring at my church, but I don’t want to sing and then sound like an idiot in front of a few hundred people… Do you have any suggestions to help make my voice sound more natural and confident? Thanks!
It is a bit weird for an athiest, though. One other options that I’ve heard of, and been meaning to try, is a workers’ choir. There’s one in most large cities, I think. Of course, then you might be uncomfortable if you don’t share the politics, which can be just as weird as religion, sometimes 🙂 – naught101 Sep 23 ’12 at 13:15
Hi I have been seeing really positive reviews of superior singing method all over the internet. But I’m just wondering what are the chances of it helping improve a voice that has really bad pitch, tone agility power basically just a terrible singing voice? And realistically how long would it take to helpimprove your voice.
Assuming that you are new to Aaron’s program, I’ll have to explain everything from scratch – starting right with what is included with this program, and how it will help you add quality to your voice when singing.

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h helped my daughter have a great experience. On top of that she was flexible with the material and was open to helping students learn songs they actually wanted to learn. I would highly recommend her to everyone!”
Singers, why limit yourself to one genre? Many artists have produced amazing cover songs to put their own spin on tunes, even those not in their particular genre. Here, St. Augustine, FL voice teacher Heather L. shares six covers worth a listen…   How amazingly awesome is it to hear a song re-sung by a singer in a way that’s totally unlike the original version? The correct answer? Really amazingly awesome! Sometimes it can change the way we hear the lyrics completely, sometimes it’l … Read More
If you notice the keys on the piano, note that the pitch “do” occurs more than once along the keys. The entire range of notes from one “do” to the next is called an octave. As your vocal range expands, you may achieve the ability to sing several octaves. To practice this, a piano would be very helpful. Press the key of the note “do” on the piano. This may be anywhere, depending on the type of instrument you have, such as a soprano, alto, or mezzo. Note that your voice will be traveling in an uprising fashion, so choose the spot accordingly. Start from a pitch you can comfortably sing. If you are an alto, it is best to start at a spot further down on the piano. Likewise, if you sing soprano, start higher. Mezzos should find a spot somewhere in between, midway throughout the keys. If you do not know your vocal type, make an estimate and find what works for you. Press the key “do” on the piano, and match pitch with your voice. Hold out this note as long as you comfortably can. Then, press the “do” one octave higher than the one you were singing and match pitch, holding it out accordingly. If you find this is too high for you, either start lower from the beginning, or you could try half of an octave by going from “do” to “so” instead. After singing the higher note “do” match pitch with the lower one again and sing it out to a comfortable extent. If you are a beginner, this may be enough octave training for the day. If you choose to persevere and move on, try singing out the note “re” as long as you comfortably can, then matching pitch with the higher note “re” and holding it as long as you may. Then hold out the lower note “re” once more. Try this practice with the notes “mi, fa,, so, la, ti, etc. depending on the stretch of your range. This exercise is intended to lengthen and strengthen the range of your vocal chords. Please be cautioned of straining your instrument.
The singing program is very fitting for various types of singers, beginners and professionals alike. It has also gained some widespread popularity on the internet. Learning the whole course may take some time, but as you finish the course, the fruits of your labor will be very rewarding.
It’s fascinating stuff, and not a single second of our lesson is wasted. Even when David asks me about my journey to his place, it ends with his pianist Katie saying “Hmmm, interesting” and playing David a trio of notes on the piano. “The reason we had that conversation,” he explains, “is so I could work out where on the scale your natural speaking voice falls.” We spend the last half hour focusing on my karaoke song. I’ve picked Fleetwood Mac’s Don’t Stop because I love Christine McVie’s plaintive voice and the song’s range seems limited enough for a novice like me. Yet there are many other things I overlooked, from needing to think about who the song is addressed to (and picking a similar situation in my life to focus on), to the fact that the verses are densely packed with notes, which makes the rhythm tricky.
This module is all about advanced vocal techniques and voice strengthening exercises to help take your voice to the next level. If you have been practicing diligently throughout the entire course, you will likely see great progress in your singing voice by this point.
I have a passion for singing! I’m a 15 year old girl and the only job I have ever wanted was to be a singer. The thing is, I dont know how good I am or if I can make my goals happen. I would like to have a more controlled voice for sure. Is there any more tips you can help with so that I can learn to control my voice? Also, with my pitch. I don’t know if it’s because I dont open my mouth enough or if I am trying to hard but I cant seem to make myself happy with my pitch. Any tips or suggestions? Thank you! xx
Before the Superior Singing Method I had been struggling for years with inconsistent pitch and terribly shrill tone. I had several vocal coaches simply tell me to give up. My parents would drive me hours and get up at 4am to take me miles away to a guy that sorta helped. Turned out he was another dead end.
Voice lessons usually cost from $10-$35 for a half-hour lesson in most areas. However, professional-level instructors may charge as much as $100-$200 or more an hour, depending on their expertise and reputation. Typically beginners start with half-hour sessions, although they can be 45 minutes or an hour, depending on the teacher’s preference. Some teachers or music schools provide a free initial consultation to determine your current singing range and potential; others may charge $10-$40 or more for this service. Generally, lessons are paid for in advance, at the first of every month.
You will start with the fundamentals of singing in the first module, and then progress to breath management, mastering vocal tone, improving pitch, signing with power and resonance, hitting higher notes, improving vocal agility, and finally learning techniques for strengthening your voice.
Always listen to what you are singing. You can achieve this easily by either plugging one of your ears with your finger or putting your hand in front of your mouth. Do not cover it though. Then, change your pitch slightly until you are certain that you are singing in the right key.
It may seem like common knowledge, but it’s important to compare different teachers’ rates with the lesson lengths they offer. Otherwise you could accidentally assume one teacher charging $60 for 60-minute session is twice as expensive as another charging $30 for a 30-minute session, when in reality the per-minute rate is exactly the same.
Find your range. Your range is the measure of pitches you can sing between your lowest and highest notes. Try any number of classical musical scales (you can easily find them with a simple online search) and see which notes on the bottom and which notes on the top are impossible for you to clearly sing.
Aaron Anastasi is the founder of Superior Singing Method. He’s a famous vocal coach (and an actor actually, IMDB) from Los Angeles, California. He has a successful YouTube channel with currently over 5,000,000 views and almost a 100K subscribers.
Within the first couple of weeks of my singing lessons, I noticed a remarkable change within my voice and vocal range. I have been taking vocal lessons with Deborah for over three years now. Thank you Deborah for all your continued hard work and dedication!
Because the voice is uniquely individual, my approach to each student is strictly based on their needs as a vocalist. I listen to each student and develop a program for development based on the needs I hear as well as the desires of the student.
Thanks for checking out this Superior Singing Method review. Although I’m writing this for a website that provides information about singing better right now, I was not a great singer initially. And even now, I’m continually trying to improve my voice.